The whole concept of being “right” or providing correct answers has failed us.

This is not theory, by the way, this is shown in psychology literature consistently.

Anyway, it starts at a very young age when we’re taught that the most important thing is to answer the questions on a test correctly.

Remember when the teacher asked a question and you raised your hand and provided a WRONG answer?

The other kids probably laughed. You probably sat there, embarrassed AF, telling yourself you’d never raise your hand again unless you were 100,000% sure of the correct answer.

It’s ingrained in us from a young age to chase this relative concept known as being “right.”

However, I’m not here to get philosophical. I’ll save that for a 1:1 conversation if you’d like 🙂

I’m here to discuss a more productive way.

Imagine if we were taught from a young age to ask better questions.

THAT would be some powerful education.

You see … being inquisitive, seeking to understand, and asking questions are where true learning and growth happen.

How does this apply to your fitness?

In more ways than you can imagine.

You can learn to ask better questions

You often seek the “right” diet vs. asking questions about the sustainability of the diet, why you want to do it in the first place, and how it would fit within your lifestyle.

Often, you seek the “right” decision with a fear of failure looming over you vs. asking the question, “What if I never try?”

You often assume the correct answer is that you’re just not able to be consistent vs. asking the question of what consistency even looks like for you and how that may change over time.

You’re often embarrassed by “wrong” decisions which cause you to keep to yourself instead of reaching out to your coach … just like that second grade version of yourself who got the wrong answer when called upon.

You often think more about the cost so you can make the “right” financial decision vs. asking the question: what does this cost me if I don’t do it?

You often assume that other people who appear to be successful did it the “right” way vs. asking the question of what you can learn from their journey and what doesn’t apply to you at all.

I could play this game for hours.

But, I’ve got movers coming today so I need to wrap it up.

Bottom line … ASK QUESTIONS. SEEK TO UNDERSTAND.

It’s not about being right.

Being right is relative anyway.

You want to play the facts game? It’s exhausting. “Facts” have 10 studies proving your point and 10 studies disproving your point … most of the time.

A fact is that asking better questions is more effective in learning than just trying to always have the correct answer.

Does this make sense? What is one question you can ask yourself after reading this that would help you better understand your own journey?